Tag Archives: moving to Malaysia

Thanks for the Memories, Malaysia

And so we arrived at Chiang Mai International Airport, checked our documents at the counter and went right through security without checking any bags. Having never flown in Asia without the hassle of waiting for checked bags, it felt strangely liberating but also like we’d forgotten something. Taking a three-day jaunt to Kuala Lumpur to officially terminate our participation in the MM2H Retirement Program, we took the only daily non-stop flight on Air Asia and touched down around 9:30 PM. Given the detail-oriented nature of our agent who insisted on being in constant touch by text and the late flight, we knew we’d better take care of data services ahead of time rather than rely on our shitty old Malaysian carrier.

First time I had this in the passport

Hitting the mall earlier, we visited the AIS store (our Thai cell carrier) and despite their limited English skills, they sold us a data-only plan in Malaysia with 2 Gb of data for 7 days at a ridiculously low cost of 300 Bhat (about $9.25 USD). All we had to do was click the roaming button on arrival and sure enough, when we attempted to use our old Malaysian carrier’s app, the phone number and our profile were long gone. Because I had a new passport, my agent said I could enter on a 90-day tourist status but it might be better to show them the old passport with the laminated MM2H visa instead. Hoping it wouldn’t confuse them, I walked to the counter, explained I had a new passport and without saying anything, the stern stone-faced Malaysian customs agent walked out of the booth and disappeared. Having just read a story about an American family that was detained for 14 days in Malaysia due to a snafu at the Malaysian/Thai border, this unnerved me a bit and Diane watched carefully where he went while I stood at the counter. Apparently never having come across that situation before, he spoke with a supervisor for about ten minutes and finally returned. Gruffly telling me I needed to leave Malaysia within 30 days, he stamped the passport, wrote my status as “special” with a note to visit Putrajaya (where the Immigration Ministry is) and sent me on my way.

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And the Poll Results Said…..

First off, I want to thank everyone for all the feedback regarding my recent post about expat finances and my subsequent follow up that explained why perhaps finances weren’t something I should include in future posts. Understanding my readers a little better now, most feedback was positive and I learned that many folks regard the financial posts as positive input while they contemplate their own experimental expat early retirement. Others felt the blog should only be about travel adventures and that nobody cares about the world’s current political situation and its effect on expat life or our own personal finances. So here’s my take on where the blog goes from here.

Not my intention

As I’ve alluded to many times, the blog isn’t a travel blog about wanderlust or all how early retirement is all about fulfilling our travel fantasies. With thousands of travel blogs, some good, some bad, I’m not here to compete with those folks. Nor is early retirement just about travel, at least not for people like us that joined the ranks of the non-working with much less than we’d need to be globetrotters. Having been laid off about five years before I would’ve preferred, traveling is an added benefit but needs to be carefully planned and isn’t the main focus of why we chose early retirement. Granted we’ve had some great adventures and those are often what folks want to read about most but every day isn’t vacation nor is retirement always great so I like to also discuss the ironic, comical and often cynical parts that convey a more realistic idea of what you might expect should you take the plunge. Usually receiving comments that I “tell it like it is”, I think sugar-coated stories of a fantasy retirement are a dime a dozen.

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Fame and Fortune

Solidifying my belief that the internet is a very strange place, the other night I was laying in bed playing Words with Friends when I got an interesting email. Almost deleting it as spam, I read curiously before deciding if I should click the attached link. Although everyone should probably use a VPN while using your PC or devices, the dangers magnify tenfold in Thailand where there’s a high incidence of internet fraud, identity theft and a world of malicious intruders waiting to jump into your hard drive’s memory every time you click. Anyway, the seemingly questionable text read as follows:

My name is Anuj Agarwal. I’m the Founder of Feedspot.
I would like to personally congratulate you as your blog Experimental Expats has been selected by our panelist as one of the Top 100 Expat Blogs on the web. 
I personally give you a high-five and want to thank you for your contribution to this world. This is the most comprehensive list of Top 100 Expat Blogs on the internet and I’m honored to have you as part of this!

 

Relatively new to blogging, I knew nothing about Wordpress or anything involving technology for that matter back when I started the blog. After being unceremoniously laid off in 2013, I spent over three months self tutoring before I made my first post. During my first year I did the typical younger generation things like replying to every comment, searching similar blogs and utilizing other social networking tools while attempting to build a following. Feeling somewhat satisfied for creating an expat blog people seemed to like before ever having stepped foot out of my homeland, I received a Liebster Award which is given to new bloggers with small followings by other bloggers.

Playing along with the award’s acceptance requirements, I spent a week finding other blogs, nominated the blogger and created a chain letter that gets passed to other award recipients. Eventually tiring of duplicating my old job by spending all day in front of a computer, I soon began concentrating more on content and less on socializing. Frankly, I hate Twitter and refuse to tweet, have no Instagram account, would never use Snapchat and I’m sadly oblivious to whatever new apps the twenty something digital nomads of Chiang Mai are using. And the only reason I even have a Facebook page for the blog is so my even less technically inclined friends back home can follow us because many of them hate blogs or think the “click here to follow” link is too much work.

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The Semi-Big Milestone

Speaking by text yesterday with a childhood friend I haven’t seen in 16 years, I laughed at his reaction to my Facebook post about  inexpensive and efficient healthcare here in PenangJokingly asking how much it costs in Southeast Asia for braces, he implied he’d use that as an excuse to come visit and take care of his teenage son’s dental needs. Responding by asking when he’s retiring, he laughed and told me he’ll be working forever because he loves his Silicon Valley tech job. While admirable, I’ll never understand anyone that thinks working until you’re way too old to experience all the great things life has to offer ranks higher than early retirement. In his defense, he’s only 53 and probably has a lot more accomplishments left in his career. Conversely, I spent 31 years in and out of cubicles working as a support specialist for more investment advisers, banks and brokers than I care to remember. Other than learning how to be a self-directed investor able to amass a portfolio big enough for a shot at early retirement after my unexpected layoff, my working years garnered zero in the way of fulfillment or career satisfaction and always served as a means to an end.

Having read countless articles about people more successful than me choosing early retirement to attempt other personal goals, I set out with good intentions when we started our early retirement exactly two years ago this week. Unlike many others, exploring my inner skill set isn’t so easy. Uninterested in starting a business (the most common reason cited), I can’t see working 100 times harder than I did in the office and risking any capital when we have no income. Possibly the world’s least handy person, all things related to building, crafting or creating things are out and learning other languages sounds about as fun as a root canal. Highly fond of wildlife, we both talk about volunteer projects involving animals and our American friend (a working expat) who engages in 20 different things even gave us an opportunity to work with monkeys for a week. But we’d just returned from a three-week trip to Myanmar and the job demanded too much of an immediate commitment of our own money and resources so we tabled that retirement goal for now.

Which leaves me with the blog. Starting 2 1/2 years ago and not knowing anything about WordPress, the number of followers isn’t what I’d hoped nor is the level of interaction but having just passed 100,000 page views and now averaging over 100 per day, my no-nonsense blend of sarcastic realism obviously appeals to someone. Fascinated that over 38,000 people in 168 different nations spent some time reading my commentaries, this is probably as good as it gets for me when it comes to utilizing modern technology. So I’ve decided to accept this milestone as a my first small accomplishment since retiring and although writing comes easy and I enjoy sharing stories, I guess it’s a skill and it may wind up being my best and only creative endeavor. Pondering what to write to commemorate the event, I decided share five of My Own Personal Favorites that haven’t received as much traffic as The Reader’s Favorites. Thank you to everyone that’s ever spent some time supporting me.

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The House Call

Unlike Trump’s Draconian States of America, not all things from yesteryear are negative. Here in Southeast Asia, sometimes things are strangely backwards but work better than you’d ever expect. Case in point; Early and mid January brought an unseasonably large amount of rain with large thunder claps and impressively beautiful lightning strikes. Normally not caring about swimming in the rain, western culture teaches us all to leave the pool during lightning strikes although I’ve never heard of someone actually being struck by lightning by not adhering the warning. Anyway, during one particular loud thunderstorm, I had our favorite Bay Area radio station playing on IHeartRadio. Utilizing our very shitty internet signal, bluetooth and a Sony soundbar, the radio suddenly stopped. Unfazed since the internet signal in Batu Ferrenghi works as well as AT&T Worldnet Dialup Service circa 1999, I waited a minute since it sometimes just pauses and eventually got up to do one of our sixteen daily reboots.

meer_mouseNoticing a blank screen on the soundbar, my first thought was a loose connection. Having dusted the entire TV console and stand earlier, I’m famous for dislodging cords, wires, outlets and various other things that give our telecommunications expert (Diane) fits. Not seeing anything obvious, I tried unplugging things and changing the batteries in the remote but the power remained off. Having exhausted my technical skills, I patiently waited until Diane finished showering and decided to pretend nothing happened. Not wild about always being blamed for anything that’s wrong with all things electrical, I figured I’d let her turn on the TV later that night and then mention the power loss incident. Deciding to approach it delicately, I mentioned the loud thunderstorm and worked it into the conversation as a defensive mechanism that might explain a possible power surge. Naturally, we only have one surge protector and it guards our ancient computer with the obsolete Windows Vista Operating System, so it’s feasible that a lightning strike that hit the building might have somehow jolted the TV.

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Girl Power; Khmer Style

Given how the future of women’s rights in America probably took an enormous step backwards this month, I thought I’d start this post about our last day trip in the Siem Reap area with an empowering historical fact. Combining three fascinating sights into a complete day, my personal favorite was Banteay Srei, an architectural jewel of Angkorian art and one of the most popular HIndu Temples of the Khmer Empire. Aside from its beautiful layout of three rectangular enclosures separated by a causeway, they built the entire structure from red sandstone which can be carved almost like wood. Earning the nickname The Pink Temple, it’s also one of the only temples commissioned by a brahman and not a king.

imageConstructed in 967 A.D., the foundational stele tells us that its creator was a scholar and philanthropist who helped those suffering from illness, injustice or poverty. Known for its pediments (the triangular space above a rectangular doorway) and lintels (horizontal beams spanning the gap between two posts that can be decorative or structural), you’ll find entire scenes of Hindu mythology depicted. But that’s not the interesting part. Its modern name translates into “Citadel of The Women” and there’s several interpretations. The first refers to the intricate carvings found on the walls. Characters from Indian mythology, Aspiras are divine nymphs or dancing-girls and the widespread use of them as a motif for decorating walls is a unique Khmer feature. Also called Devatas, or minor female deities, they’re usually seen standing around and not dancing. More specifically, the second theory revolves around the intricacy of the carvings themselves. Said to be too fine for the hand of a man, decorative carvings cover every available inch of space which leads me to the third and most interesting theory.

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Almost Turkey; our second expat Thanksgiving

Celebrating our second U.S. Thanksgiving away from North America almost proved more challenging than last year when we enjoyed a complete turkey dinner with all the trimmings. Taking advantage of the large American expat community, lots of Chiang Mai restaurants offer up Thanksgiving feasts at a very reasonable price and that’s where you’ll find all the Yanks including us since we just happened to be visiting during the holiday. Although Malaysia shares its Northern border with Thailand, it may as well be on another planet when comparing Thanksgiving Day offerings. Mostly unknown to Asians, finding fresh turkey in Malaysia is difficult, expensive and simply unreasonable. Although a handful of places in Penang do offer a special holiday menu, the price tag comes in somewhere around $80 USD per person. Considering we usually paid about $15 for our annual turkey compliments of the local Safeway, this lavish and ridiculous price seems OK if you’re independently wealthy, For the rest of us early retiree expats living on a budget, it’s simply outrageous.

imageFortunately, our newest friends that we met thanks to this blog are Alfred and Zeenat. A recently retired professional chef from Switzerland, Alfred and his wife just became MM2H participants in September and happen to live in the next town over. Generously offering to cook us a five course dinner as a way of paying us back for providing helpful information about moving to Malaysia and navigating through the MM2H paperwork, we didn’t wind up with chicken rice on the holiday after all. Starting out with his very creative cheese ball decorated like a turkey, we want to thank Alfred and his wife for hosting us and helping us enjoy the holiday in a place where Thanksgiving is just another Thursday. Even including beer, wine and soft drinks, it’s possibly the nicest thing anyone’s done for us since we arrived in Malaysia.

Although an actual whole roasted turkey wasn’t on the menu, Alfred clearly put a lot of effort into this and offered us hot and cold appetizers including cucumber with feta and tomato paste, smoked garlic sausage with cornichons and mustard , “turkey club” and turkey meatballs, pepper terrine with cranberry, spiced lamb skewers on Swiss potato rosti, and several others. After the mixed green salad with pumpkin dressing and a Thanksgiving Autumn Leaf, we enjoyed a Bird Galantine with sausage, apple and cranberry stuffing, light grape-orange sauce, veggies with roasted pumpkin and honey glazed sweet Hasselback Potatoes. Finishing off with an incredibly delicious dessert, we feasted on Toblerone Chocolate Mousse with Amarena Cherry Cream. Unfamiliar with several of the dishes, I guess I’m a foodie novice despite having visited Cambodia, Thailand and Myanmar since becoming an expat.

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Going above and beyond what anyone’s done for us so far, we wanted to thank them again for their generosity and hope we can repay them someday. Never expecting anything in return for writing helpful information about the MM2H program, their kindness helped lift our spirits in a time when the homeland is experiencing some seriously tumultuous times in the tolerance department. Happy to help anyone that contacts me by email, I’ve recently received an uptick in inquiries about moving to Malaysia and specifically, the MM2H Visa. Although we plan on moving to Thailand next summer, the visa program is still Asia’s longest term and most generous visa out there and I’m happy to spend time helping anyone interested. Keeping the visa even if we move, it’s convenient for easy visa runs and useful should we come back to Penang.

mm2hWe’re also looking forward to meeting several potential candidates that asked us to meet them on their exploratory visits to Malaysia. While it’s obviously not practical for most Americans to simply up and leave due an unqualified demagogue’s rise to the presidency, clearly there’s many of you on the fence out there looking for an excuse to make the move so we’d love to hear from you. As promised, upcoming posts will detail the rest of our recent trip to Cambodia. If you haven’t already done so, please check out our Day Trip to the The Flooded Forest and Bird Sanctuary as well as A day at Angkor Wat’s must-see monuments.

Happy Black Friday to all our American friends and cheers from Penang!

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