Tag Archives: expat in Thailand

So how are we doing, anyway?

That’s a great question. Upended by a global pandemic, our Experimental Overseas Early Retirement sent us packing from Southeast Asia. Fortunately, we spent the worst of it stuck in a small Thai beach town and came away unscathed. Temporarily neglecting the blog for over a year, it’s time to make amends. Amazingly, it’s been over six years since taking the plunge and I wanted to share how we got here, what we’ve learned and why we’re back in Canada. Benefitting old followers and anyone unfamiliar with our story, I created a static page summarizing our situation from the planning stages to the post-pandemic New Normal. Hoping you’ll have a look and continue following, please navigate to Our Progress and catch up with us.

And the Poll Results Said…..

First off, I want to thank everyone for all the feedback regarding my recent post about expat finances and my subsequent follow up that explained why perhaps finances weren’t something I should include in future posts. Understanding my readers a little better now, most feedback was positive and I learned that many folks regard the financial posts as positive input while they contemplate their own experimental expat early retirement. Others felt the blog should only be about travel adventures and that nobody cares about the world’s current political situation and its effect on expat life or our own personal finances. So here’s my take on where the blog goes from here.

Not my intention

As I’ve alluded to many times, the blog isn’t a travel blog about wanderlust or all how early retirement is all about fulfilling our travel fantasies. With thousands of travel blogs, some good, some bad, I’m not here to compete with those folks. Nor is early retirement just about travel, at least not for people like us that joined the ranks of the non-working with much less than we’d need to be globetrotters. Having been laid off about five years before I would’ve preferred, traveling is an added benefit but needs to be carefully planned and isn’t the main focus of why we chose early retirement. Granted we’ve had some great adventures and those are often what folks want to read about most but every day isn’t vacation nor is retirement always great so I like to also discuss the ironic, comical and often cynical parts that convey a more realistic idea of what you might expect should you take the plunge. Usually receiving comments that I “tell it like it is”, I think sugar-coated stories of a fantasy retirement are a dime a dozen.

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