Tag Archives: early retirees

Malaysian Math

Having figured out most of our Malaysian bill payment chores, last month we received our first electric bill. Unclear why they print certain utility bills only in Malay when almost everything related to business is in English, we figured it’s because the utilities are state-run and it wouldn’t look good printing bills in a language other than your own. Describing the process to us before we signed the lease, our property agent told us online bill pay was probably the best option so I used my little security token and logged on. Attempting to add a payee, I scrolled through the list of available options and happily, I found Tenanga Nasional on the list of thirty odd choices. Uncertain what the account number was, I Googled every line of the bill and typed “in Malay” after each one and surprisingly, I deciphered it thanks to the translation skills of the greatest American company ever. Breaking down each line and assuming the important lines were near the top, I determined the bill read as follows:

The Amount to be paid (straightforward enough)
Arrears ( I assumed this meant “previous balance”)
Current Charge (assumed that meant electricity used in the current bill period)
Rounding (no cents used for payment purposes: convenient enough)
The Total Bill (assumed it meant total of the above)

Right underneath the above lines, there was a darker shaded area with lines that translated into the following

Previous bills (this had a date of 14.07.2015 and a cash amount of RM 4.25)
Final Payment (same amount but dated 18.07.2015)

Uncertain what that part meant, I assumed it had to do with the previous tenant which in our case hadn’t lived there since the spring so perhaps the small balance due was the amount of electricity used during our showings in early July. Since our tenancy began on July 15th it seemed reasonable that the last payment would’ve been made by the landlord or property agent and covered a period ending around our occupancy date Calculating the bill, it came to about $80 USD which didn’t seem unreasonable since we sleep with air conditioning. Using the bill pay function, the bank debited the ringgit from our account and it all seemed fine.

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The other day the next bill arrived. Maybe we are missing something so help us out. Listing the previous month’s bill as a credit, they the somehow added the current month’s charge to the negative number that represented what we owed (and paid) last month and came out with a credit balance because the amount of energy we used in August was RM 76.66 less than in July (And this makes sense because we were in KL for a week in August finalizing the MM2H so that explains the lower energy consumption).

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Although I haven’t been to university in over 30 years and I’m no math scholar, it seems logical that you don’t calculate a current month’s charges by adding/subtracting the amount paid in the prior month to whatever the current charges are. According to this method, they gave us 30 days of free electricity because we happened to use less than we used in the prior month. Alternatively, had we used 10% more and the bill was RM 338.30, it appears we’d be paying only RM 30.75 since they seem to be giving a credit towards the current month based on what we paid the month before even though that was the amount payable. Wow. What a great system. Confident I would’ve flunked math in this country we showed the entire bill to our property agent who came back with something to the effect of “it must be a credit from the prior tenant” despite the obvious facts to the contrary. If you understand something we don’t, by all means please enlighten us.

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An Indoor Enthusiats Mecca

Revisiting Kuala Lumpur seven weeks after arriving as “fresh off the plane” North American newbies, our perspective was a lot different the second time around. First impressions aside, although we loved the modern flair, food and luxurious five-star hotels at cut-rate prices (by Western standards), the first three-day stay was really just a quick glimpse and a chance to deposit some cash and meet our banking relationship manager. Impressed with how modern the city centre was, second thoughts set in about Penang when we first viewed its rustic environment compared to “the big city”. Fortunately it only took six weeks of island living to realize that KL is the place to be for working expats, especially those with spouses looking for social activities, big city amenities and nightlife. For the rest of us, it’s a smaller version of Singapore where shopping centres and massive office towers dominate the landscape, construction never stops and traffic rivals any big Southeast Asian city (in fact, it almost rivals San Francisco). Basically, it’s where you go when you need some pampering and a few goods unavailable in the laid back island up north.

imageEnjoying the beautiful view of Malaysia’s most iconic landmark from our luxurious room in the Traders Hotel, we settled in and had visions of hitting all the local places we didn’t have time to see the first time. As outdoor lovers, we chose the KL Bird Park as a day trip last time and decided to soak in the big city culture this time. Flipping through the local brochures describing the city’s top ten attractions, it takes minutes to realize the city’s biggest draw is the unspoken national sport: Mall hopping. Notice I didn’t say shopping because Singapore still owns that title. Patronized by a multi-cultural combination of locals and tourists, most of the cash seems to be doled out in the unbelievable multitude of food outlets that come in every size, taste and ethic flavor. Visiting the upper floors of the high-end malls offers a chance to shop prcatically distraction free since nobody seems to be interested in shelling out three month’s salary for a Kate Spade handbag. Mesmerized by the sheer size and volume of retail shopping space crammed into one square mile, Diane and I spent about an hour negotiating the air-conditioned indoor walkways and finally meandered our way to the Pavillion, KL’s answer to Orchard Road. Rodeo Drive and New York’s Fifth Avenue.

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